Braided Rivers Project Funded

Conservation
Tuesday, September 15, 2015

The Community Conservation Partnership Fund is providing and more than $33,000 to the Braided River Partnership project to improve the success of colony-nesting birds along Canterbury rivers.

Many populations of braided river birds are at risk because of recreational activity, introduced predators and weed species.  The project works with commercial operators that use braided rivers as part of their day to day activity, including jet boating, rafting and fishing.

 Working with people who use the rivers every day is an essential part of preserving braided river species.

 They aim  to identify commercial operators that utilise braided rivers as part of their day to day business:  jet boating, rafting, fishing and sightseeing tour operators, and farm stays and B&B’s in close proximity to the river to empower and enable them to assist with best practice trapping programmes, habitat improvement and monitoring and to ensure sustainability by enhancing visitor experience through ‘value added’ components, by understanding and promoting the unique nature of braided rivers, their birdlife and the cultural significance to Māori.

 Braided rivers are the only ecosystem to have its own set of targets in the Canterbury Water management Strategy.  One of the CWMS targets is to implement actions to correct the decline in usable braided river bird habitat.  Many populations of braided river birds are at risk because of recreational activity, introduced predators and weed species.   

These include:

 Tarāpuka/black-billed gull (nationally critical).


Ngutu pare/wrybill (nationally vulnerable).


Turiwhatu/banded dotterel (nationally vulnerable).